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We cant send e-mail to any yahoo e-mail addresses from our Godaddy domain name fm96.com.fj?
My first question is We cant send e-mail to any yahoo e-mail addresses from our Godaddy domain name fm96.com.fj? Many thanks for any response. Another question... From GoDaddy NEWSLETTER.

According to Chinese Media, Google is said to have bought the domains google.cn and google.com.cn for 1 million USD. Google first tried to acquire the HostGator through court, but Chinese authorities disapproved the case. If this deal actually has taken place, we have a new record for .cn-domain sales...

Comments (21)

That's a good question. I'm not sure what is the answer to your question. I'll do some Googling and get back to you if I bump into an good answer. You should email the people at Godaddy as they probably could help you..

Comment #1

I think you mean.

Www.google.cn.

? Chine is China in French..

Did you get your .com.cn , .cn..

Comment #2

.ch is the country code for Switzerland (google.ch is in German)..

Comment #3

That is a bargain indeed. Whoever got the million bux however can now buy his own little part of china and settle down..

Comment #4

I think it is a hearsay news, such as Chinese press reported before, that a company bought zj.com for million us dollars, and a company bought qq.com for million us dollars, most of these are never been proved by anyone, just a hearsay story..

I don't think google NEED to spend a million us dollars to buy their own trademark name in China. If they want, they might use a law suit to do this job, and the chances are very very good for google to win...

Comment #5

The true story is google.com.cn and google.cn sold as a package for one million..

Google.com.cn receives much more traffic than google.cn..

Google had made attempt to grab back google.com.cn through court, but failed. The owner of google.com.cn hired a top lawyer to deal with this..

ZJ.com was bought by the government of Zhejiang province for one million Chinese yuan (equals to $125,000 USD)...

Comment #6

The original owner is a known cybersquatter who has lost major ,cn disputes before. They did, however, manage to hold on to this name a couple years back when Google filed a dispute. The reasoning behind CNNICs decision to reject the transfer is questionable, but likely protects the cybersquatter until things in China change substantially. It seems Google was forced to cut a deal with them, although I would not be surprised if it was less cash and more shares..

And the moral of the story is, if someone isn't already into China go register their .cn name and make some money of it when they move in...

Comment #7

I was told (through an online chat with a Chinese knowledgeable buddy) that the lawyer of the original owner simple stuck to the facts that neither had google operated their business in China before and nor did they register their trademark in China...

Comment #8

Furthermore in China "copyright" is interpreted as "right to copy"..

Comment #9

It is pretty interesting .... A lot of countries aren't as forgiving as US ™'s are to US held companies especially .... I still don't like this type of "Squatting" though .... it would be different if it were a Generic term of some sort - But google is pretty much theirs alone ~..

Comment #10

I would have loved to own that website. Id be rolling in some cash right about now..

Comment #11

This is basically what was said in the decision. I would argue that the moment Google went on the net they were doing business in China and every other country. Oh dear, did I just agree with the French WWII memorabilia Nazis?.

I do believe that countries should have a high degree of control over how their ccTLDs are run. These countries need name space, and the best .coms were gone before many ccTLDs were available for registration. But this is just plain passing off. In a real, international UDRP Google would have won. And while I agree that it is Chinas right to do things their own way they have to appreciate that when they do things like this they only reinforce peoples stereotype of them being a chicken shit third world country full of spammers and cybersquaters..

Too true..

Comment #12

Anyhow I think it's a amazing sale..

- SW..

Comment #13

...this is er true, but things are beginning to change as China is now a member of thhe WTO. (world trade org)..

Comment #14

They certainly are. Used to be you'd have a handful of scammers selling copy bags, copy watches and copy software on the streets outside the Shenzhen train station. Now they've built a whole shopping mall there for these guys. You can buy a knock off of just about anything you want, cloths, sun glasses, even a full set of golf clubs..

And now it seems they are selling copy HostGator names. What will they think of next?..

Comment #15

Well, someone in China didn't want anyone to copy oneworldonedream.com..

Comment #16

This is interesting for sure!.

Any idea who has yahoo.cn and msn.cn ?

Comment #17

Is it only me ,but I have no problem with the concept of the right of Peoples Republic of China to determine their own destiny.This includes whether or not to agree to the international conventions regarding copyright and Patents. The US government and individuals take exception at other countries telling the Americans what to do. So why can't Americans do the same and allow a sovereign country to determine it's own rules and regulations..

After all we are talking about .CN & .Com.CN. These are supposed to be ccTLD's for chinese companies and individuals ,not American Companies...

Comment #18

This thread is about google.com.cn and google.cn HostGator names, nothing to do with copyright whatsever..

If there was a Chinese net company named "Strangeword.com" and the company was famous in Chinese speaking countries and regions but had never operated their business in English language and English speaking countries. Do you think the company has default legal rights to claim the ownership of HostGator "strangeword.us" from the owner who has had the name for many years? I don't have a set answer. However, in such a case, if the owner of "strangeword.us" hired a powerful lawyer and successfully protected his ownership, I won't blame the USA authorities and the country...

Comment #19

This is a disgussion forum, we digress sometimes!.

Very interesting! I used to get GoDaddy newsletters, but I wish I never stopped. Thanks for the info..

Comment #20

I agree with you ....

The problem is that the rules aren't the same for all ......

Comment #21

I thought that you got a "TM" for different countries. So, strangeworld.cn muight own the China TM to "strangeworld" but someone might also own the TM for it in the USA..

Comment #22


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.