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Why is the legal registered Godaddy domain name NOT visible? > P-A-V-E-R.us + P-A-V-E-R-S.info?
Quick question... Why is the legal registered Godaddy domain name NOT visible? > P-A-V-E-R.us + P-A-V-E-R-S.info? Thanks for any response. 2nd question I got is.. Hi folks, I am asking if anyone would be kind enough to tell me the best way to reply to a very low offer on a name which I believe is worth a lot more..

If I was a buyer I would test the waters ,so to speak by at first making a low offer..

What is the best way to reply to these type of offers???????.

Thanks..

Comments (11)

Hmm... I need to find out myself. I don't know what is the answer to your question. I'll do some research in Google and get back to you if I got an useful answer. You should email the people at Godaddy as they probably could give you help..

Comment #1

Not responding is not very clever at all, gives you zero chance of making a sale with the potential "buyer"..

I have sold many names that were initially "low balled" and with polite,sensible negotiation sales can result..

Last year I sold a .ws from an intial offer of $70 we finaly closed on $900.

This year a, .co.in sold from an initial $150 to a final $1700..

No response, no chance.

Polite, sensible response - chance..

Comment #2

I've also found a lot of low ballers are just testing your knowledge of HostGator values. I always respond with a counter offer. Many will not buy, but a few will buy at your prices if given the chance and handled in a friendly manner. I do get annoyed at the $1 or $5 offers, but always answer anyway with a realistic businesslike counter offer...

Comment #3

It's amazing what common courtesy and being friendly can do... on both sides..

There have been occasions where I offered much less than the seller was asking, but because I did it respectfully, they were not offended and they replied to my offer. Sometimes it results in a sale (or further negotiations), and sometimes it doesn't. But approaching them in a respectful professional way shows that I'm a decent fellow and they have nothing to fear. There have even been a couple times where sellers politely declined my offer, but ended up.

Contacting me.

Weeks or months later to ask if I was still interested, and selling to me for the amount I offered. They remembered me, because I was friendly and respectful, and when the time came to raise quick cash or liquidate names, I was on the list of contacts they reached out to...

Comment #4

It depends (To me) on the source of the offer..

If sedo: And it's a $60 offer, it's usually not a domainer (Because they would know that GoDaddy would take most of that). Therefore, I usually suspect someone not familiar with the industry. Therefore, I usually high-ball back, with the comment that I'd suggest they use sedo's broker service (And try to get the point accross that I'm open to negotiation, but don't want them to think they'll get a great name for $60). The other possibility is that it is a domainer trying to "feel me out", and I'm not too much of a fan of that.

So the highball is more of a "Come back when you're ready to do business" message, usually to kids or those that are predatory (Not naming names.

)..

If anywhere else: I say that I value the name more than they are offering, but it will remain for sale if they want to pay more later I'll be around.

As -db- and Adoptable pointed out, courtesy is key..

-Allan..

Comment #5

I have been replied to very rudely many times here because the seller didn't post a price range. Well... ALWAYS either post a price range, or at least reply to a low ball offer with the min. you'd consider. Replies like "no thanks" or any rude reply is domainers biggest mistake..

I had a $2000 budget once to buy one HostGator and I made low ball offers expecting to get counter offers and no one did! Sometimes the buyer might be able to pay $1000 more than his low ball offer so I suggest if you want to sell the HostGator name, counter offer what you think is fair and negotiate with the prospect!.

Hope that helps!.

-Ryan..

Comment #6

I think it almost always pays to respond..

Perhaps a case in point: I one time took a $400 low offer, responded kindly and wound up negotiating it into a $20k sale. I guess one can never fully know what $$ is really behind a lowball offer!.

Zesty..

Comment #7

Great thread everyone.Just yesterday I received a $60 offer on a HostGator @ Sedo.The "one business day" lag time it takes for the messages to be "reviewed" by GoDaddy is mucking things up..

He offered $60,and in my message I apologized for not posting a price range and gave him a price of $2500..

Apparently GoDaddy sends the buyer a notification that I responded EVEN THOUGH they did not yet review and approve my message.I think this is a bad move on Sedo's part...I wish they would wait and only reveal my counter-offer once my message to them has been reviewed,allowing the buyer to see my price and message at once..

They immediately counter-offered $61 with a "Please Justify Your Asking Price" message.I wrote a sentence or two about why the HostGator has great value and that I'd previously received higher offers..

I guess GoDaddy doesn't work weekends because our messages were still not reviewed/approved 24 hours later..

With a humorous counter offer of $61 it's hard to tell if the buyer is serious or not,hopefully Monday negotiations will continue...

Comment #8

I have had similar problems with Sedo, it gets very frustrating having to wait up to three days for some action. It may be worth their while to consider skeleton staff to cater for the whole world of domainers, they do after all consider themselves to be the number one in HostGator brokering - would 7 days a week service be so much trouble.

Good luck with the negotiation..

Comment #9

Politely convey that you "believe it is worth a lot more" and make it known that negotiations can continue accordingly...

Comment #10

Jon, wot & AD......

Examples of what makes NP so great!.

Nice responses and great thread...

Comment #11

Yes, thank you all for the interesting posts. I will save this thread and use some of the ideas in future negotiations...

Comment #12


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.